Blog

  1. Utah State Flag

    Utah State Flag was adopted in1913 and modified in 2011. The history of Utah state flags is full of mistakes and responses. The first state flag was designed in 1903 with a white image of the state seal on a blue background. When the Sons and Daughters of Utah Pioneers asked for copy of the flag for the battleship USS Utah, the flag ordered came with gold circle around the seal. In stead of reordering the correct flag, the state legislature adopted the new flag with a gold circle added. In 2011, the legislature passed a resolution to fix the mistakes from 1922.

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  2. South Carolina State Flag

    South CarolinaState Flag was adopted in 1861. The current South Carolina state flag was designed by Colonel William Moultrie in 1775 to be used by the troops during the war. The flag was used during the defense of Sullivan Island from British troops trying to capture Charleston. After the Sullivan island war, the flag became the main flag of the South Carolina militia. The current flag is the same flag that was flown during the Civil War. The Palmetto tree was added in 1861 to represent the Palmetto trunks used in the defense walls of the Sullivan Island fortress.

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  3. Oklahoma State flag

    Oklahoma state flag was adopted in 1925 and was modified in 2006. Oklahoma's initial flag was a red banner with the number 46 in the center because it was the 46th state to join the union. But the red flag background color was associated with communism, the Daughters of the American Revolution set up a contest to select a new flag. The winning flag design belonged to Louise Fluke. The flag had a traditional Osage Nation buffalo-skin shield and seven eagle feathers on a sky blue background. In 1941, "Oklahoma" text below the crest was officially added to the flag, in order to fight against illiteracy in the state.

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  4. New York State flag

    New York state flag was adopted in 1778 and modified in 1901. New York's flag is the oldest design in the nation. The coat of arms was added to the flag in 1778 and the flag was flown during the Revolution. But, in 1901, the state decided to change the flag's background from beige to blue color . This made their flag indistinguishable from other states with blue flags.

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  5. Nevada State Flag

    Nevada state flag was adopted in 1929 and was modified in 1991. Nevada's first flag was designed and in 1905, and it was awesome.All in caps it simply said "SILVER, NEVADA, GOLD" with several silver and gold stars included. It was designed by the Governor of that time. In 1926, a contest was announced to design a new flag. The winning flag design came from Louis Shellback III. The new flag included only a small emblem of the state in the upper left corner on a plain blue background.

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  6. Mississippi state flag

    Mississippi state flag was adopted in1894 cancelled in 1906 but continued to be used unofficially until being readopted in 2001. Mississippi's flag has a controversial history. In 1865, after the Civil War, Mississippi revoked the "Magnolia Flag" which had officially been adopted when entering the Confederacy. Thirty years later, the state decided to adopt a new flag which included the Confederate battle flag in the corner. However, in 1906, the Mississippi legislature actually cencelled the laws that designed the new flag. However, that flag continued to be used by the state for 100 years. In 2001, the state designed a new flag and it was voted by the people of Mississippi. The voters rejected the new flag design in favor of the old flag. Currently, the Speaker of the State has called for the state to remove the Confederate icon from the flag.

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  7. Maryland state flag

    Maryland state flag was adopted in 1904. Maryland's flag is the heraldic banner of George Calvert, first Lord of Baltimore. Calvert settled the colony that would become today’s Maryland. But he died a few weeks before the charter mission was completed. The flag has two coats of arms, the gold and black and red and white colored arms of the Calvert's Crossland family. Confederate sympathizers adopted the Crossland arms while Union loyalists waved the Calvert arms during the Civil War,. After the war, the two were combined in Baltimore in 1880. The state officially adopted the flag 24 years later in 1904.

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  8. Kentucky state flag

    Kentucky state flag was adopted in 1918. The Kentucky flag was created by an art teacher, Jesse Cox Burgess. The flag design includes the state seal and sprigs of goldenrod, the state flower. During the Civil War, both the Confederate flag and the Union flag were flown depending on location and the progression of conflict.

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  9. Idaho state flag

    Idaho state flag was adopted in 1957. The Idaho state flag is made of a state seal set on a blue background and includes a banner reading "State of Idaho." The seal was designed by Emma Edwards Green. Idaho is the only state seal to be designed by a woman. The seal includes a miner and a woman. Those figures represent equality, liberty and justice. They represent the state's mining, forestry and farming history. The flag first was used as a state military banner. The first Idaho infantry carried the flag in 1898 during the Spanish-American War.

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  10. The Connecticut State Flag history

    The Connecticut state flag has a field in azure blue; the shield is white and called "rococo design. Three supported grapes are placed inside the shield, each with three bunches of grapes. The motto of the state of Connecticut is printed in dark blue on the streamer. It reads Qui Transtulit Sustinet (He who transplanted still sustains). Historically, these grapes were passed down from a seal originated from England by Colonel George Fenwick in 1639. Colonel Fenwick's seal was the seal of the Saybrook Colony. It was used for the Connecticut Colony in 1644. Some think that the 3 supported grape vines represents three colonies, New Haven, Saybrook and Connecticut (Hartford), which merged as "Connecticut" by 1665. Grapes represent good luck and peace. Vines represent friendships. Of course, grape vines are often associated with wine production and wine makers.

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