Monthly Archives: April 2019

  1. Cleveland city flag

    Cleveland city flag is one of the most generic city flags designed anywhere. You would not be surprized if I tell you that this flag was designed by a high school student in 1895. The super simplicity of the crest is the proof for that. Any high school student with good hand drawing skills would come up with such a design.

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  2. Tuscon city flag

    The seal is large enough to read from a distance on this city flag. Most people like the quirky-ness of the Tucson city flag seal, but it was designed way too complex for a flag. But for today’s modern technology digital printers, number of colors or complexity of the artwork is not an issue to overcome. Flags are printed just like getting printouts from your desktop printer using 4 color process.

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  3. Boston city flag

    Boston flag is one of the flags that the industry calls a “seal on a bed sheet,” or few call it a “seal snoozer.” But we have to give it a credit for the seal to be large enough so you can read it from a distance. However, the monochrome illustartion of the city makes the seal itself pretty boring.

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  4. City flags and their evaluations. Milwaukee city flag.

    Milwaukee city flag can be considered as one of the World’s Weirdest Flags. The one thing is sure that it is very distinctive from other city flags. This is also the perfect example of what is called a “committee flag”. They are usually designed by a group of people or a single politician with the goal of fitting in as much symbolism as possible. They tried to fit in so much in this flag that you can make 2 or 3 flags with many graphics within this flag. Luckily, a Milwaukee graphic designer has iniciated a contest to come up with a new design.

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  5. Prince Edward Island Flag

    PrinceEdward Island’s provincial flag is a modified version of the provincial coat of arms. The lion and the big tree represent England, while the three smaller trees signifies the Island’s historic three counties.

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  6. Northwest Territories Flag

    The Northwest Territories flag has the NWT crest between two blue stripes, representing the territory’s rivers, lakes and oceans, which is very similar to the Yukon flag. The crest is made of a white fox which is the traditional animal of northern Canada.

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  7. British Columbia Flag

    BritishColumbia’s flag was designed in 1960 during the activist era of premier WAC Bennett (1900-1979). The flag was based on the B.C. coat of arms, It represents an old saying about “the sun never sets on the British Empire." It represents a never-setting sun on the waves of the Pacific horizon. British Columbia once was the Empire’s farthest-flung points.

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  8. West Virginia State Flag

    West VirginiaState Flag was adopted in 1929. West Virginia officially separated from Virginia in 1861. Virginia had withdrawn from the Union to join the Confederacy and West Virginians, as a result of that, separated from Virginia to rejoin the United States. They designed their own state seal and placed it on a white background to create their own flag. In 1907, the West Virginia state officially designed a new flag that featured the old battle flag on the front side and the state’s well known flower on the back side. But in 1923, people in West Virginia realized a double-sided flag was too expensive and complicated to manufacture and they went back to their original design.

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  9. Utah State Flag

    Utah State Flag was adopted in1913 and modified in 2011. The history of Utah state flags is full of mistakes and responses. The first state flag was designed in 1903 with a white image of the state seal on a blue background. When the Sons and Daughters of Utah Pioneers asked for copy of the flag for the battleship USS Utah, the flag ordered came with gold circle around the seal. In stead of reordering the correct flag, the state legislature adopted the new flag with a gold circle added. In 2011, the legislature passed a resolution to fix the mistakes from 1922.

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  10. South Carolina State Flag

    South CarolinaState Flag was adopted in 1861. The current South Carolina state flag was designed by Colonel William Moultrie in 1775 to be used by the troops during the war. The flag was used during the defense of Sullivan Island from British troops trying to capture Charleston. After the Sullivan island war, the flag became the main flag of the South Carolina militia. The current flag is the same flag that was flown during the Civil War. The Palmetto tree was added in 1861 to represent the Palmetto trunks used in the defense walls of the Sullivan Island fortress.

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